We Are Family

Ever have one of those intense periods of meetings and encounters that really brings home how creatively connected we all are? The past week has been one such period for me.

 

It made me think about the true value of the creative arts – whether as profession, hobby or study.

Creatively Connected

On Friday, I was privileged to attend an undergraduate dancer’s degree show. My connection was that I had provided part of the soundtrack. This followed the student’s participation in a show I put on last year. Accompanying me was one of the dance professionals who had worked with the students on that project.  She also happens to be a key member of the Dance Notes team. In turn, she had put me in touch with the heads of post-graduate and undergraduate dance at the college. And these introductions had paved the way for including students within my work.

That same evening, I went to a gig to see a band, whose bass player I worked and toured with in another group. The producer of that band has also just mixed an album for me and among the audience were various other local musicians. One of those, I currently perform with regularly.  And, somehow, these connections made the experience of seeing this wonderful trio even better.

Let the Children Play

Saturday, I traveled to watch a performance that was the culmination of a residential course. This is run by our local music services. My son plays with the symphonic wind band they host every week. Their residential has been a highlight of his calendar for several years.

What is striking about that course is its focus on collaboration. At the concert, students presented performances in around five different ensembles. These comprised: woodwind, brass, strings, percussion and voice. However, over the course of the 3 or 4 days spent on the residential, the youngsters had worked together in as many as 30 different groups. Many of these had formed quite spontaneously and the staff are always keen to encourage such initiatives.

Old Friends

I was especially pleased to be able to attend the concert this year as I had a booking myself for that evening. I thought there would clash but the evening gig had a late start. This even afforded me time for a stop-off en-route, to visit an old friend from university. He also still works within the dramatic arts, facilitating better communication in organisations through Forum Theatre. And the ceilidh band, with which I was performing that night, is run by another former university colleague.

Reflections

It struck me that the experiences those students were having on the residential course mirrored those of my own professional life as a musician. Forging connections, maintaining relationships and finding meaning through shared endeavour are key to creative success and fulfillment. Whether this leads to a so-called ‘career’ is neither hear nor there. The main thing is the enrichment, connection and greater understanding it provides.

After all, in the end, we all are family!

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